Lakes Entrance B & B

Lakes Entrance  Bed and Breakfast Retreat

Spa at the B & B
Accreditation  Goldsmith's in the Forest
Harrison's Track Lakes Entrance, Vic 3909 Ph. 61 03 51552518
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Goanna or Lace Monitor
Goanna in chook house Forest experience Lakes entrance Bed and Breakfast

The goannas


or Lace monitors are usually around in summer, they collect the eggs from our chook shed whenever they can get there before we do our daily collection.  If we find one in the chook pen we allow it to find a way out, staying well clear as it has sharp claws and a strong bite.
Goannas help clean up the bush by eating carrion although they can become a pest around camp grounds or picnic areas where people leave food scraps.  The goannas grow to a length of about 2 metres, they will usually scamper up the nearest tree if disturbed. Bush folklore says if startled by a goanna, lie flat on the ground so they don't mistake you for a tree and run up your leg.
Goannas dig a hole in a termite mound to lay their eggs, the termites seal over the hole and keep the eggs at the correct temperature for hatching. The termites can then form a food source for the hatching goannas. There is a termite mound on one of the forest walks from the Bed and Breakfast where patches on the side of the mound show where the goanna has laid her eggs.  Goanna oil, in folklore, is a traditional Australian remedy for almost anything although it may never have existed except as a brand name. Goanna is a traditional food of the Australian aboriginal people, they used goanna oil as a salve.
The goanna on the left was eating eggs and scraps in our hen house, we moved away to avoid him panicking and injuring himself.

 

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